Call for Papers: INPUTS International Symposium “Karl Marx, Marxism, and the Global South”, Bremen
Feb21

Call for Papers: INPUTS International Symposium “Karl Marx, Marxism, and the Global South”, Bremen

Call for papers: INPUTS International Symposium “Karl Marx, Marxism, and the Global South”, University of Bremen, City University of Applied Sciences, Bremen, 4-5 May 2018 Organisation: Dr. Detlev Quintern (INPUTS, FSMV University, Istanbul) Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf (INPUTS, University of Bremen) Prof. Dr. Hans-Heinrich Bass (City University of Applied Sciences, Bremen) On 5 May 2018 the 200th birthday of Karl Marx will be commemorated with a variety of events and exhibitions throughout the world. In early 1848 Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels published their seminal text Communist Manifesto, which was translated into more than one hundred languages and which today is part of UNESCO’s World Document heritage. The history of societies was understood as a history of class struggle. As a consequence of the break with utopian, reformist and anarchist tendencies, Karl Marx was striving to unveil the inner nature of capital — a theoretical-methodological approach, which was mainly based on a critique and a new interpretation of  economics as developed by the classical thinkers (A. Smith, D. Ricardo, J. St. Mill). The Capital (Das Kapital), first published in Hamburg in 1867, ranks among his most efficacious writings. Because of his theoretical ideas on the economic struggles of the lower classes and on the issue of private ownership, Karl Marx is considered as one of the most influential thinkers on economic justice worldwide. The symposium aims at critically acknowledging, reviewing and discussing Marx’s ideas, influences and legacies from a variety of perspectives of the Global South, focusing on postcolonial interpretations and adaptations as well as on circulations of utopian ideas. During the 20th century and the liberation movements in the Global South, often memorized traditional-societal and Marxist ideas (on modernization) were interwoven into utopian visions of the future (e.g. in the writings of José Mariátegui/Peru, Kwame Nkrumah/Ghana or Ali Schariati/Iran). Marxist thoughts had and still have an effect on visions of a fairer world in the Global South and beyond. The question how more just societies and sustainable modes of production could be designed, is not only a historical and utopian but also a question of contemporary relevance, deserving closer attention in the humanities. The following questions will be addressed, among others: ‒       How did Marx understand the historical-societal developments in Asia, Africa and the Americas? ‒       How did he interpret anti-colonial movements? ‒       What importance within capitalist production was assigned to the Global South in various interpretations of Marxist ideas? ‒       On what kind of understanding of nature was his interpretation of the development of productive forces based on? ‒       How were and are Karl Marx’s ideas received and utilized in the Global South? ‒       What are possible utopian potentials of Karl Marx’s work in today’s globalized world with nations, labour forces, capital,...

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Call for Papers: Where is Home?/Diaspora in Nigeria – International Conference at the University of Abuja, Nigeria
Feb20

Call for Papers: Where is Home?/Diaspora in Nigeria – International Conference at the University of Abuja, Nigeria

Call for Papers: WHERE IS HOME? NIGERIAN DIASPORA / DIASPORA IN NIGERIA AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE at the University of Abuja, Nigeria in collaboration with the University of Muenster, Germany, 19-22 November, 2018       CHIEF HOST Prof. Michael U. Adikwu, FAS, FPSN, FSTAN, MIPAN Vice Chancellor, University of Abuja   Confirmed Keynote Speakers: Bernardine Evaristo, Writer, and Professor of Creative Writing, London Sam Egwu, Professor, Resident Electoral Commissioner, Niger State, Nigeria Siyan Oyewoso, Professor, Director General, Centre for Black Culture and International Studies UNESCO Office, Osogbo, Nigeria Chudi Uwazurike, Professor, Institute for Governance & Leadership in Africa, Abuja   SPECIAL GUEST OF HONOUR Alhaji Lai Mohammed, Hon. Minister of Information and Culture, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria Hon. Abike Dabiri – Erewa, Senior Assistant to the President on Foreign Affairs and Diaspora   BACKGROUND With global mass migration, transcontinental transport and worldwide instant communication, the set-up, constellations and dynamics of societies is changing rapidly. Whereas the organization in nation states is still widely perceived as the primary ordering principle, incisive change has long set in. New patterns of individual as well as group identity formation and social and cultural belonging have emerged as powerful, often transnational force fields competing with more traditional patterns of identity politics and cultural belonging. Of these, diaspora has evolved as a particularly vibrant and pliable concept which, although not a new phenomenon, has the power to focus important aspects characterizing today’s societies and cultures on the move. With its origins in the migratory patterns going back to Biblical times in Judaism and Greek antiquity, diaspora formations have developed across the globe. With its multi-ethnic and multicultural society, Nigeria is a particularly striking case in point, both as a site of diasporic formations within and across its political, administrative and cultural borders, as well as the country of origin for vibrant Nigerian diasporas around the globe. Nigeria’s multiple indigene-settler issues and diaspora experiences raise fundamental questions: Where is home? Who is a citizen/settler? What are his/her rights and entitlements? How do the arts, including literature, painting, music and theatre refract and shape diasporic experience and identity? What is the impact of indigene-settler and diaspora formations on nation building and global peace? Can diaspora formations which have proved extremely resilient be supportive of constructing peaceful societies? Such and similar questions about diaspora in general and with a special focus on diasporas in Nigeria or Nigerian diasporas world-wide are the focus of this international conference. The conveners invite contributions from suggested multiple sub-themes including (but not limited to): SUB-THEMES Conceptual and theoretical issues of Diaspora Nigerian diasporas and indigene-settler politics Religion and diaspora in Nigeria Nigerian economics and...

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Call for Papers: Context is for Kings – An Edited Collection on Star Trek: Discovery
Feb16

Call for Papers: Context is for Kings – An Edited Collection on Star Trek: Discovery

Call for Papers: Context is for Kings – An Edited Collection on Star Trek: DiscoveryDeadline 15 April, 2018 https://networks.h-net.org/node/73374/announcements/1366448/context-kings-edited-collection-star-trek-discovery 51 years after Star Trek: The Original Series first aired on U.S. American TV, Star Trek: Discovery is updating the franchise for the 21st century. Like TOS was in the 60s, Discovery is firmly rooted in the zeitgeist and current political climate—a fact that has led to surprising amount of backlash from some corners of the fandom. Thanks to the advantage of streaming platforms over network television, the series is also updating the largely episodic structure of the earlier installments to a more serial and coherent storytelling that allows for longer narrative arcs as well as a focus on in-depth character development.Set 10 years before The Original Series, Discovery is notably darker than any of the previous iterations of the franchise. Depicting the Federation at war with the Klingon Empire, the first season raises questions about identity and othering, war and trauma, and the conflict between idealism and pragmatism. It explores how Starfleet, an organization ostensibly dedicated to exploration and diplomacy, deals with the ethical questions surrounding war, and the lengths people are willing to go to win. These questions are deepened and complicated by the fact that the series, unlike any of the previous entries in the Star Trek canon, focuses not exclusively on the crew of the U.S.S. Discovery and the United Federation of planets, but also presents the events from the point of view of the Klingon Empire. A foray into the Mirror Universe dominated by the fascist Terran Empire throws Starfleet’s ideals and the characters’ struggles to live up to them into even sharper relief.In addition to the questions raised by the narrative, Discovery has continued the franchise’s commitment to representing diversity on screen. Featuring a woman of color in the lead role, a racially and ethnically diverse main and supporting cast, and introducing the franchise’s first gay couple (played by out gay actors), the show is even more inclusive than any of the previous Star Trek series. Discovery thus has once more proven Star Trek’s continued cultural relevance and has, after only one season, already warranted an in-depth academic study that engages with the series from the perspectives of a variety of academic disciplines, such as cultural studies, gender and queer theory, political science, philosophy, and more.We thus invite contributions to an edited collection to be published with a notable international publishing house or University Press. The deadline for submissions is April 15, 2018. Please include an abstract (300 words) on the topic you would like to write on, plus a short bio-blurb, and send...

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Call for Articles: American Studies in Scandinavia 
Jan30

Call for Articles: American Studies in Scandinavia 

Call for Articles:  American Studies in Scandinavia is a respected and traditional (established in 1968) peer-reviewed journal in American Studies. It is interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, inclusive to academic specialties as varied as history, literature, politics, geography, area studies, media studies, ethnic studies, culture studies, law, economics, and linguistics. We currently draw manuscript submissions from authors around the world. We want to offer an inviting venue for scholars to publish their latest research, express their ideas, and build a sense of academic community.   Send your inquiries and manuscript submissions to the editor Dr. Janne Lahti at janne.lahti@helsinki.fi If you have a book to review or would like to review one, contact Prof. Pirjo Ahokas at piraho@utu.fi For guidelines...

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CfA: BAA 10th International Summer Academy, “Questions of the Archive” June 2 – June 10, 2018 in Miami
Jan21

CfA: BAA 10th International Summer Academy, “Questions of the Archive” June 2 – June 10, 2018 in Miami

The Bavarian American Academy in Munich invites applications for its 10th International Summer Academy for Doctoral Students and Junior Faculty in American Studies on “Questions of the Archive” June 2-10, 2018, in Miami in cooperation with Florida International University and Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg. Link to BAA_SummerAcademy2018_CfA Following the widely discussed archival turn in the humanities, this year’s summer school focuses on questions of the archive, its production, authority, and transformation. We seek contributions in the broad interdisciplinary field of American studies that approach questions of the archive with regard to a) poststructuralist scholarship on the contingency of the archive and the epistemic anxieties it reveals, b) assumptions of authority based on power relations (evident in canon debates and absences in the archive), and c) more recent technological developments and the changes they imply (big data, distant reading,  digital humanities). The archive informs both history and memory, and thus the archive can claim to be invested with legitimacy and status. Questions of knowledge production in the present moment are prominently addressed by Diana Taylor (“archive and repertoire”), Ann Laura Stoler (“the colonial archive”), James Clifford (“archival silences”), and Saidiya Hartman (“the archive of slavery”); these scholars call attention to explicit and implicit assumptions about archival energies in both preserving knowledge for future generations and potentially withdrawing it from ongoing public circulation. Next to these theoretical considerations, we will explore different kinds of ‘official’ archives (material, oral, digital, and so forth), forms of subverting the archive (‘ghosts’ in the archive), and alternative archives in a global, postcolonial world. The program of the academy is structured into three parts: keynote lectures by US and European speakers – including, so far, Elisabeth Bronfen (Zurich University), Donette Francis (University of Miami), Gesa Mackenthun (University of Rostock), Donald Pease (Dartmouth College), Janice Radway (Northwestern University), Dan Royles (Florida International University), Barry Shank (Ohio State University), Kathy-Ann Tan (Uppsala University) work-in-progress presentations by the doctoral participants, workshop sessions in which participants discuss key texts in the field. The program also includes a cultural program in and around Miami. We invite doctoral (and postdoctoral) students to apply electronically with a statement of purpose CV a 2-page project description one letter of recommendation Please send your application by March 1, 2018 to: Margaretha Schweiger-Wilhelm:       schweiger-wilhelm@amerika-akademie.de Heike Paul:     heike.paul@fau.de Martha Schoolman:    mschoolm@fiu.edu Participants will be selected based on the strength of their applications. Acceptance to the Summer Academy includes a full academic and cultural program, accommodation, and a travel grant. The tuition fee is 300 €. Find more information on the homepage of the BAA: Summer Academy...

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